Microchip information on the latest USB tech offerings

Most of us have used a USB stick at some stage or another. Today, because of the latest digital and micro technologies available to us, many of us have elected to ditch our old USB sticks and flash drives. These devices are obsolete, so why bother to keep them hanging about, is what many have said. But perhaps they moved a little too quickly and missed out on something quite important and quite possibly useful.

Microchip and other online information paves the way for more of us to note what is available in terms of the latest USB technological developments and product offerings. It is also useful to have a little added information in our bin. USB is the acronym for the Universal Serial Bus. They are not just applied to computers laptops and mobile devices, but have been in many other areas of the home, such as the kitchen’s microwave oven and the living room’s hi-fi set-up or entertainment center highlighted by its flat-screen TV monitor.

There are numerous differences among USB cables; common sense could have told us this, given that USB cables serve different purposes, right. Differences are generally picked up when we try to connect an ancient port with a new one. Guess what, they don’t fit or match. Today’s most common USB cable is known as the USB Type-A 2.0. Visually, it’s the standard rectangular-shaped device that can only really be inserted in one direction.

There are also square standards, used mainly for printers and scanners. New advances in USB technology has led to the introduction of the USB 3.1 which has been designed to be a lot faster than previous versions that it is gradually coming to replace. Today, USBs still share the same Type-A design, meaning that it will always fit a Type-A port.